Friday, June 7, 2013

Going Long: Legends, Oddballs, Comebacks and Adventures - In Review

Because why wouldn't someone who loves to read consistently participate in two book clubs?

This month for the running/racing/endurance book club, put on by Jamie at From Couch to Ironwoman, chose to read "Going Long: Legends, Oddballs, Comeback's and Adventures" put together by the editors of Runner's World Magazine (one of my most favorites, obviously!)
Source
From Amazon.com:
For more than 40 years, Runner’s World magazine has been the world’s leading authority on running—bringing its readers the latest running advice and some of the most compelling sports narratives ever told. From inspirational stories such as "A Second Life"(the story of Matt Long, the FDNY firefighter who learned to run again after a critical injury) to analytical essays such as "White Men Can’t Run" (a look at what puts African runners at the front of the pack), the magazine captivates its readers every month.

Now, for the first time, the editors of Runner’s World have gathered these and other powerful tales to give readers a collection of writing that is impossible to put down. 

With more than 40 gripping stories, Going Long transcends the sport of running to reach anyone with an appetite for drama, inspiration, and a glimpse into the human condition.

As you can see, this book consists of multiple short stories about runners, all marathon runners to some extent, encompassing the personalities of runner's (and some of them definitely are the reasons that so many people think marathoners are crazy or eccentric now.) We see Deena Kastor and her rise to American marathon greatness (along with her training partner for a time, Meb Keflezighi, another American great). We hear about John A Kelley and Bill Rodgers, two American Boston Marathon winners.

All of their stories are inspiring and interesting. All of them may offer you motivation as a runner to work harder, smarter or stronger.  Personally, I most enjoyed reading women's stories, as I find them (understandably) more relatable.

Have you read this book? Did enjoy it or find it inspiring?

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